Bee Informed: Honey Bee Science and How to Help

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On Tuesday, May 7, from 6:30 to 8:30 pm, at the Douglas UCC Friendship Hall, 56 Wall Street in Douglas, Michigan, Anne Marie Fauvel, Tech Team Coordinator for the Bee Informed Partnership based at the University of Maryland, will share the latest data on Honey Bee populations in Michigan, and how we can manage our own landscapes to help these important populations thrive.

Grand Haven-based Fauvel is charged with the logistics of five mobile regional technical-transfer teams working directly with commercial beekeepers, to bridge the gap between industry and academic research.

The Tech-Teams lead the sampling effort to collect copious amount of data on colony health, management and treatment data and act as consultant with their regional and national perspectives. Fauvel also teaches at Grand Valley State University and is the apiarist on campus managing the small GVSU Meijer Campus Apiary in Holland Michigan.

She will build the case for the importance of the honey bee and their current population state in the United States and Michigan.

Are honey bee populations declining? And are pesticides to blame? Fauvel will discuss the many causes of colony losses and give example of local and national programs, and research efforts to better understand colony health and improve colony survivorship through best management practices.

Learn more about Fauvel and the Bee Informed Partnership at https://beeinformed.org/.

This program is free and open to the public.

Road and Beach Clean Up Events — We Need YOU!

Ah Spring in Michigan! The rains and the snowmelt, all revealing the detritus of the long winter. It’s time to clean up our roads and beaches, friends!

Will you help?

Three events coming up:

Adopt-a-Highway Road Cleanup

The DUCC Creation Justice Team has organized two cleanups of our stretch of highway in April. We will clean on

April 13, 9am to Noon

and

April 16, 4 to 7pm

If you can join us, please sign up on the sheets in the Friendship Hall, or write to us using the contact form, linked above.

Adopt-a-Beach, Alliance for the Great Lakes  Beach Cleanup, Saugatuck

Saturday, April 20 from 1-3:30, Beach cleanup day. Find details on the event and register here:

http://greatlakesadopt.org/Secure/Event/14875

Thanks so much for any and all help you can give in cleaning up and in sharing these events ahead in your communities!

The Reluctant Radical: Movie and Discussion

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GreenMichigan.org‘s Macatawa Creation Care in partnership with the CRC’s Climate Witness Project has scheduled a showing of The Reluctant Radical for…

Thursday, April 11, 2019

at 7:00 pm
at the Park Theater, in Holland, MI.

They are gathering a panel discussion following the film.

The film raises challenging questions around the issue of climate change:  Sanity vs Insanity–is it insane not to respond to climate change?  What’s my role if I’m not an activist? Is it civil disobedience–or maybe you’re just a nag?

You can explore the film further at:

https://www.thereluctantradicalmovie.com/

Please join in the discussion. And perhaps the action, too?

Kudos for Our Mentors

https://whtc.com/news/articles/2019/mar/15/birkholz-freestone-headed-for-michigan-environmental-hall-of-fame/

Please follow the link to learn about two of the 2019 Michigan Environmental Hall of Fame inductees, our own Creation Justice Team mentors Ken Freestone and the late Patty Birkholz.

They are both so deserving.

The induction ceremony is set for 6:30 p.m., May 15, 2019, at the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum in Grand Rapids. People who want to attend should email the event chairman, Ron Brown, at rnbrown227@gmail.com.

New Ways to Love Trees — Follow Up

 

On Saturday, February 23, 2019, Drs. Greg Murray and Kathy Winnett-Murray presented A New Way to Love Trees at Douglas Congregational United Church of Christ. It was standing-room only, informative, fascinating, and so very useful.

These zoologist-biologists taught us all the ways trees help our homes and communities, clean and manage our water, save energy, house wildlife, impact our health, and yes, how they communicate with one another. They also discussed their latest research on the threats to our local Hemlock populations.

Drs. Greg and Kathy like to say, ”Even trees standing outside your window in the dead of winter are providing you with ecological, economic, and health benefits that most folks take for granted.” All while “just standing there.”

They also showed us how to plan for new trees on our properties, using i-Tree Design, linked below, and how the City of Holland is working with the Murrays and other Hope Professors and students to identify and evaluate the contribution of trees to the City. We can take their lessons home with us, using these links:

i-Tree Design, Determine the best spot to plant your new trees!

My Tree (by i-Tree), Learn about your tree benefits

National Tree Benefit Calculator

PlantSnap, Plant Identification App

TreeSap, Android Phone App for Holland Area by Mike Jipping

Energy Saving Trees Program

Save Michigan Hemlocks

Holland-Hope College Sustainability Institute

City of Holland Sustainability

 

EmpowerU! Advocating Invasive Species Management 

Do you work to combat invasive species in Michigan but feel compelled to do more? Learn how to work with decision makers, influence management decisions and stop the spread of invasive species.

 

In conjunction with National Invasive Species Awareness Week, Michigan State University Extension is launching an online course called, “Empower U! Advocating for Invasive Species Management” to move your invasive species work to the next level.  

 

Woodland and shoreline owners, master volunteers, and natural resources professionals can grow their skills to meaningfully engage decision makers about invasive species. Through the course you will learn how to craft your own argument to persuade decision makers about the importance of invasive species (aquatic and terrestrial) management or removal in your area.  

 

The course begins on March 2, 2019 and consists of 5 weeks of online sessions (around 1 hour/week), concluding with an in-person workshop on Friday, March 29, 2019 in Okemos (attendance required).

 

Through this 5-week course, which consists of a series of self-paced online learning activities and one in-person workshop, participants will: 

  • Gain understanding of the roles and levels of government and whom to contact regarding invasive species management.
  • Learn to use skills such as influence, power, persuasion, framing, questioning and listening in interactions with decision makers. 
  • Know where to find reputable information on the status of invasive species in your area.
  • Create an engagement plan and experience practicing it in a safe, peer-learning environment.
  • See yourself as a resource to decision makers on invasive species management.
  • View engagement with decision makers as a norm and encourage others to do it, too.
  • Network with other people passionate to make a difference around invasive species. 

 

The cost is $30/person and includes access to the online course, handouts and lunch on the 29th.

Click here to register today! Deadline for registration is Friday, March 1st.

  

Questions? Contact Julie R. Crick, Natural Resources Educator, Michigan State University Extension

(989) 275-7179; crickjul@msu.edu

New Ways to Love Trees, February 23

New Ways to Love Trees

Douglas, Michigan — On Saturday, February 23, Drs. Greg Murray and Kathy Winnett-Murray, professors of biology at Hope College, will talk trees at the Douglas Congregational United Church of Christ. The event is free, open to the public, and runs from 6:30 to 8:30pm.

These zoologist-biologists have been studying trees (and the things that live in them and near them) since they came to Hope College in 1986. As ecologists, they love exploring interactions among creatures in all sorts of environments. Hope students often join them in their research, particularly in Hope’s splendidly forested dune forest preserve, and in Costa Rica, where Greg has studied forest dynamics for 37 years. Greg and Kathy have also led May Terms in Ecuador, the Galapagos, the Sonoran Desert, and Tanzania.

Drs. Greg and Kathy explain, ”Even trees standing outside your window in the dead of winter are providing you with ecological, economic, and health benefits that most folks take for granted.” All while “just standing there.”

During the summer of 2018, the Murrays and an eclectic group of tree-lovers — biology student Katelyn DeWitt, Hope’s sustainability coordinator Michelle Gibbs, partners from the City of Holland, and computer science professor Dr. Mike Jipping and his app-savvy students– found new ways to love trees. They’ll share the story of what they learned together and how they hope it will promote the value of trees to our communities. It’s a story about the benefits of trees now and in the future.

The professors will share several resources for people to take home/link to/download as part of the presentation.

Attendees should feel encouraged to bring their cell phones in case they want to try out some of the apps presented during the talk.

The presentation is free to the pubic, light refreshments will be served.

This talk is part of the education series conducted by Douglas UCC’s Creation Justice Team. To follow the series and the work of the team online, visit https://ducccreationjusticeteam.blog/.

Michigan’s 2019-2022 Environmental Road Map

https://michiganlcv.maps.arcgis.com/apps/Cascade/index.html?appid=547b6c211c91436c9453db35bd78bcfb&fbclid=IwAR0nKJqgrL4dvJ8_nLT8n67O3rrgnY2DPFYb9hDQnU4uq2w9iIn7lhinllQ

Are you looking for ways to advocate for our environment with local and state legislators? Well, here you go.

The link above takes you to the road map developed by Michigan’s League of Conservation Voters along with more than 20 other environmental organizations across the state. It’s a good read. The top priorities for the first term:

*Shut down the dangerous Line 5 pipeline.
*Establish a PFAS drinking water standard so we can protect communities and ensure clean drinking water for all.
*Remove barriers to clean, renewable ‘energy like wind and solar.

But there’s much more. Follow the link!